I believe the first thing to mention about Kotaro Isaka’s “Remote Control” is its ability to switch to different people’s perspectives smoothly. They are not in chronological order; rather they are moving from problem to solution. Events that neither the characters nor the readers can comprehend aren’t solved at the very end of the book, but instead in the next chapter or two. The writer is letting us focus on the book without wasting our time trying to interpret the meanings. Another one of this novel’s strong suits is its moral. It teaches us that while we may now have seemingly stable and happy lives, it can easily be taken away from us by those in power without us doing anything wrong. Isaka tells us that on the surface it may seem to be a righteous, fair, and just society, when in fact it is the opposite. The story shows us that we are constantly in a scary position and always being manipulated by “the people upstairs”. Overall this book’s storytelling and writing isn’t anything too special. Although the messages are very good, the writing is quite bland and even during a chase, I sometimes lost focus. 4/5 stars.
@Basilisk_0 of the Hamilton Public Library's Teen Review Board

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